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A bearing ring usually subjected to axial loading will normally not creep on its seat

Update:14-07-2021
Summary: A bearing ring usually subjected to axial loading will normally not creep on its seat and a friction fit isn't usually ...
A bearing ring usually subjected to axial loading will normally not creep on its seat and a friction fit isn't usually needed unless dictated by certain conditions of the application. For example, when an axial load is applied to it with its rolling parts on a non-uniform plane, there is no requirement for a friction fit. Similarly, the axial load which has been applied to the bearing and which rolls about its seat of travel without contacting the face of the bearing does require friction fit. On the other hand, when the bearing is subjected to axial loading and its rollers contact the face of the bearing all the time, it does need a friction fit. So far, so good.
If two objects are sliding along a given path at different speeds, one of them must have some sort of clearance from other parts of the path for the other part to move with ease and not cause a sudden and undesired acceleration. This condition is called free-flow. In engineering jargon, this condition is called creep. A bearing ring with a low clearance between its seat and a stationary curve which cause a small amount of free flow may be ideal for use on a load that doesn't tend to change very much, as in the case of a loading or unloading vessel. On the other hand, a bearing ring may be a good choice if the change in the load distribution tends to occur only over short distances, such as when the bearing ring is placed between two parallel curves at different rotations about a common axis of rotation.
A bearing ring that doesn't creep or move when applied to a load that tends to change abruptly is called an axial load. A bearing ring that changes creepily, though, is called a lateral load. And a bearing ring that remains stationary but changes its slope with respect to the stationary curve is called a dynamic load. The appropriate bearing ring for a particular application can be found by undertaking a comprehensive evaluation of your load, coupled with a detailed understanding of what the appropriate bearing ring would do in any given situation.